Author: GinaBurgess

Making Your Reader Love Backstory

By Randy Ingermanson Con’t from August 19th Newsletter discussing how to create a backstory that your readers beg for… Not getting our newsletter? Easy peasy, email us and we’ll put you on the list! Interior Monologue Interior monologue is the sequence of thoughts that pass through a viewpoint character’s mind. The reader can hear these, Read More …

Changing Priorities

by Mary Norsworthy The story is told of a conversation between a parakeet in a cage and a lark on the window sill. The lark looked in at the parakeet and asked, “What is your purpose?” “My purpose is to eat seed,” said the parakeet. “What for?” “So I can be strong.” “What for?” “So Read More …

Comfort zones squeeze the life out of growth.

By Gina Burgess On Thursday, August 17, Tom Blubaugh will be talking about the differences between hobby writing and professional writing. This is a crucial question that the author needs to know the answer to before spending the time required to make money writing. It’s a commitment. It’s also risky. What if I fail? What Read More …

Video Helps Establish Your Platform

By Tom Blubaugh With the introduction of the Smart Phone and the revolutionary evolution of the video camera, anyone can create a video and they should. It’s one of the most popular modes of communication in the world. Approximately 30 years ago, most people would never consider using video to communicate with potential clients or customers. It Read More …

Map, plan, outline, your series

by Randy Ingermanson Mapping Out Your Series Readers like a series, so it’s good marketing sense to write your novels in a series. But that raises a question. How do you map out a series of novels? Mapping out one novel is hard enough that many novelists choose not to do it. They write their novels without a Read More …

Accuracy in Historical Fiction…

by C. S. Lakin Taking a look at Fact or Fiction? How Novelists Can Blend Factual Research with Creative Storytelling by author Jack Woodville London. Readers who have some passing knowledge of literature might be startled when in reading The Three Musketeers they encounter a passage in which D’Artagnan refers to Gulliver’s Travels. The dilemma is that The Three Read More …